The annotated bibliography

Introduction

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited. This paper will describe the selected potential reference that has been mentioned to previous Annotated Bibliography. This paper also identifies, reviews, and selects additional references for addition to my Annotated Bibliography.

Annotated Bibliography

Ashwill, M. A. (2005). Moving Vietnam forward. International Educator. Washington, 14, 46-53. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

Ashwill featured the Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF), a creative and innovative scholarship-for-debt-program that will train a generation of Vietnam's most academically gifted young people and will likely transform Vietnam's scientific and technological landscape. VEF was a model long-term educational exchange program between the US and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam that provided fellowships for Vietnamese nationals to study at US institutions of higher education at graduate levels in diverse fields of science. As of September 2008, 42 Fellows had graduated, which represents 16% of all Fellows (42/267) to date. The obtained degrees were as follow: 11 doctorates, 30 master's degrees, and 1 professional degree.

Endres, M. L. & Hurtubis C. A. (2009). The multifaceted nature of online MBA student satisfaction and impacts on behavioral intentions. Journal of Education for Business. Washington, volume 84, 304-313. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

The authors analyzed surveys gathered from more than 250 students enrolled in online MBA courses at a large university in the Midwest. As the authors expected, student satisfaction in the survey consisted 5 elements: satisfaction with faculty practices, learning practices, course materials, student-to-student interaction, and course tools. Student satisfaction predicted the purpose to advocate the course, faculty, and university to others. The universities' managements had to focus on a variety of different courses, faculty, learning tools, and online learning tools. The authors realized that the lack of online MBA students' intention to recommend any one of these areas could be more directly targeted with knowledge of the importance of each online satisfaction aspect.

Hayden, M. & Lam, Q. T. (2007). A 2020 vision for higher education in Vietnam. International Educator. Washington, volume 16, 14-18. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

Only 10 percent of the relevant age group participated in higher education, mainly because of the lack of available places; young people from rural areas and poor backgrounds were less likely to be included among enrollments; management processes were severely constrained by an excess of regulatory controls; the process of curriculum renewal was slow moving and bureaucratic; academic salaries were not sufficiently attractive to elicit a strong professional commitment; and most academics were not involved in research.

It was difficult to see how Vietnam would achieve institutional autonomy in the higher education system given the relative lack of an effective governance infrastructure across the system, and given also the precarious position of university rectors whose authority, it seems, would remain forever circumscribed by Communist Party policies and processes and a state disposition to govern by using tight regulatory control. Vietnam was not lacking in energy and commitment. Its 2020 vision for higher education may, however, be a case of trying to do too much too quickly. After 15 years of renovation, Vietnam's education had gained important achievements but is still facing weaknesses and shortage. To achieve 2020 goals, the role of education and science and technology had to become decisive and the requirements for the development of education must become urgent.

Menchaca, M. P. & Bekele, T. A. (2008). Learner and instructor identified success factors in distance education. Distance Education. Melbourne, volume 29, 231-253. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

To better understand their perceptions of optimal tools and strategies for success, this research analyzed the experiences of learners and mentors in an online education environment. A qualitative constant comparative analysis methodology supported by an appropriate conceptual framework guided the study. According to the authors, optimal distance education environments should address factors identified in the conceptual model. Although the research un-veiled interesting findings about student and faculty experiences, a better and more definitive understanding of specific tools and factors, perhaps identifying the best of the best that exist for certain contexts, was still needed. The author revealed that many factors at human, pedagogic, technologic, course, and leadership levels all impact online learning experiences.

Mendes, G. J. (2004). An analysis of potential target markets in India for online education offered by United State universities. Capella University, Ann Arbor, 211 pages; AAT 3138509. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest Dissertation database.

This study analyzed India's potential target markets for online education offered by American universities. This research offered insights into the Indian higher education market for providers of online education by investigating the expectations and needs of this population. Although not intended as a blueprint for direct expansion into the Indian market, this study laid the groundwork for institutions to perform their own research through questions that address elements that were specific to the school in question. The Vietnam higher education market had many similar features to Indian one. Therefore, some lessons could be learned from this research that could apply to Vietnam education market.

Overland, M. A. (2006). Higher education lags behind the times in Vietnam. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, volume 14, 156-160. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

Two decades after embarking on a policy of renewal, which gave a green light to the free market, Vietnam was one of the fastest-growing economies in the world. Yet Vietnam's higher-education system was in a time warp: 20, even 30 years, out-of-date. It lacked a credible research environment, produces few PhDs, and was locked in Soviet-style pedagogy. Per capita, Vietnam was one of the poorest countries in the world, but a growing stratum of wealthy Vietnamese were willing to pay for the best education that money can buy. Most of the newcomers to the market had been English-language centers and computer-training institutes. In the past, these institutions had been financed by foreigners, but had Vietnamese names on their documents. Prohibitions against foreign investment had lifted only enough to interest one university to set up shop here. This framework would help to develop American online education in Vietnam. This new learning methodology would help students overcoming the geographic barriers to enroll American online learning programs without prohibit of the authority.

Peterson, S. S. & Slotta, J. (2009). Saying yes to online learning: a first-time experience teaching an online graduate course in literacy education. Literacy Research and Instruction. Coral Gables, volume 48, 120-137. Retrieved September 15, 2009, from the ProQuest database.

This article explained the modifications that the mentor made to a face-to-face course to adapt it to an online learning environment. The online format provided an effective forum for in-depth discussion of the topics and issues and for students to develop relationships with their peers and their instructor. Over 60% of students' notes went beyond descriptions of classroom practices and observations to reflecting on practice using the article ideas and evaluating the ideas in the article. The author analyzed that a pedagogical advantage in online teaching as a result of the increased accessibility to all students' thinking about the topics and the greater opportunity for all students to participate fully.

Valley, T. J. & Wilkinson B. (2009). Vietnam higher education: crisis and response.

This paper analyzed about the crisis in Vietnamese higher education. The authors examined the magnitude of the crisis and its root causes. They also described how key actorsthe Vietnamese government, the Vietnamese people, and the international community responded to the situation. This paper stressed on the importance of institutional innovation as a necessary component of an effective reform platform. Sweeping governance reforms are the key to improving Vietnamese higher education. However, reforming academic institutions anywhere is a long term process. The authors recommended that Vietnam authority must build a new institution of higher learning that from the outset incorporates good governance into its institutional. Such an effort would have a transformative impact on Vietnamese higher education. A new institution could offer an attractive home to young Vietnamese scholars and scientists who are currently uninterested in pursuing academic careers in Vietnam. Second, a institution can be a model which other universities can learn from and emulateas well as a source of healthy and much-needed competition.

Conclusion

The aforementioned information has mentioned some references that have been added to my Annotated Bibliography. These references will be used when I conduct my dissertations about Vietnam higher education and how Vietnamese higher education learners take the advance knowledge in that offered by American online education system.

References

  • Ashwill, M. A. (2005). Moving Vietnam forward. International Educator. Washington,14, 46-53. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Endres, M. L. & Hurtubis C. A. (2009). The multifaceted nature of online MBA student satisfaction and impacts on behavioral intentions. Journal of Education for Business. Washington, volume 84, 304-313. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Hayden, M. & Lam, Q. T. (2007). A 2020 vision for higher education in Vietnam. International Educator. Washington, volume 16, 14-18. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Menchaca, M. P. & Bekele, T. A. (2008). Learner and instructor identified success factors in distance education. Distance Education. Melbourne, volume 29, 231-253. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Mendes, G. J. (2004). An analysis of potential target markets in India for online education offered by United State universities. Capella University, Ann Arbor, 211 pages; AAT 3138509. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest Dissertation database.
  • Overland, M. A. (2006). Higher education lags behind the times in Vietnam. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Washington, volume 14, 156-160. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Peterson, S. S. & Slotta, J. (2009). Saying yes to online learning: a first-time experience teaching an online graduate course in literacy education. Literacy Research and Instruction. Coral Gables, volume 48, 120-137. Retrieved September 15, 2009 from the ProQuest database.
  • Schram, T. H. (2006) Conceptualizing and proposing qualitative research. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall
  • Shank, G. D. (2006) Qualitative research: A personal skills approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.

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