Wal-Mart dominates the competition

What do you think of when you hear the name Wal-Mart? Cluttered aisles? City-size stores? Or do you think about a monopolistic business idea that plans on taking out every other competing store? In "Wal-Mart's Latest Move to Crush the Competition," writer Sean Gregory reports about the new renovations to Wal-Mart stores across the country. Wal-Mart is remodeling its stores to make them bigger and better. This project, known as "Project Impact" plans to reshape Wal-Mart into a cleaner, friendlier place to shop. Wal-Mart is responsible for the downfall of many mom and pop stores around the country. Also, they plan on targeting other stores such as Kmart, Target, Toys "R" Us, Michaels, and Rite Aid to put them out of business.

Today I am going to explain the effective writing tools used by Sean Gregory in the article "Wal-Mart's Latest Move to Crush the Competition." I am also going to explain how he uses those tools to support his two-part thesis: Wal-Mart is remodeling, which is a positive thing that he is for; Wal-Mart is planning on taking out the competition, which is a negative thing that he is against. The writer claims that Wal-Mart is "the world's largest retailer," and it has a new plan to take out competing businesses. He also claims that Wal-Mart is remodeling many of their stores as part of the new "Project Impact." He is effective in supporting his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing, and their plans to take out the competition are a negative thing by using ethos, pathos, logos, and language.

First, the writer uses ethos to effectively prove the part of his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing. One example of ethos is the credible expert testimony from retail consultant Burt Flickinger III. Flickinger is the managing director for Strategic Resources Group and a veteran Wal-Mart watcher. "They've got Kmart [and Rite Aid] ready to take a standing eight-count next year." He goes on to state, "They've knocked out four of the top five toy retailers, and are now going after the last one standing, Toys "R" Us." The fact that Wal-Mart is intentionally trying to put these other stores out of business is a negative thing. The writer uses this quote from Flickinger, who is very credible in his field, to prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's push to eliminate the competition is a negative thing.

Next, the writer uses ethos to effectively prove the part of his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing. He includes the opinion of Wal-Mart's Northeast general manager Lance De La Rosa as an example. "We've listened to our customers, and they want an easier shopping experience," says De La Rosa. "We've brightened up the stores and opened things up to make it more navigable." This helps prove the writer's thesis that the remodeling of Wal-Mart is a positive thing because it makes shopping there easier. Another example of ethos is the testimony from Joseph Feldman. Joseph Feldman is a person of credibility because he is a retail analyst at Telsey Advisory Group. Feldman says, "Under Project Impact, Wal-Mart is providing more of a full supermarket experience within its walls." He then goes on to say, "this definitely improves efficiency." Improved shopping efficiency, as opposed to the current inefficient design of Wal-Mart stores, is a positive thing for Wal-Mart. By using quotes from Joseph Feldman, the writer uses ethos to effectively support his thesis that the renovating of Wal-Mart stores is a positive thing.

The writer uses pathos to prove the part of his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing. One example of the writer using pathos is "'Project Impact' will be the catalyst to wipe out a second round of national and regional retailers." The writer also says, "That's bad news for many smaller businesses that can't compete." This is a negative thing because it is about Wal-Mart putting other companies, such as many mom and pop stores, out of business. By incorporating his own knowledge about Wal-Mart's "Project Impact", the writer uses pathos to effectively prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing.

Next, the writer uses pathos to prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing. One example of pathos is when the writer says "Many analysts believe that the store-operations background of new CEO Mike Duke will keep investors quite happy." This quote means that under new direction of CEO Mike Duke, "Project Impact" will have a positive effect on Wal-Mart's revenue. The writer uses words like "happy" to bring emotion, or pathos to the article. He makes the audience believe that making more money will keep the investors or shareholders of Wal-Mart stock happy. By using pathos, the writer pulls the audience into the article and effectively proves his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing. The writer uses logos to effectively prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing. One example of logos comes from Burt Flickinger III, managing director of Strategic Resources Group. "Look, they're selling the stuff that accounts for 80% of Michael's business, at 20% of the space," says Flickinger. This example illustrates how easy it is for customers to shop at Wal-Mart instead of Michaels. There will be a negative effect on Michaels' productivity because of the new "Project Impact" Wal-Mart stores. Another example of logos comes from the writer saying, "The pharmacy has been pulled into the middle of the store," which makes the "$4 Prescriptions" signs hard to miss. Because prescription prices at Wal-Mart are unmatched, it is hard for any pharmacy to keep up with that kind of competition. The fact that Wal-Mart is competing with pharmacies is a negative thing because it will cause some of the smaller stores to go out of business. Finally, the last example of logos is the quote from the writer, "With Circuit City out of business, the electronics section has been beefed up." This means that the new and improved Wal-Mart stores have a bigger selection in electronics than they had in the past. This is a negative thing because it was what put Circuit City out of business. By using logos the writer effectively proves his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing.

Next, the writer uses logos to effectively prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing. One example of logos comes from 73 year old shopper Sharon Tilotta. When talking about the smarter layout of the "Project Impact" store she says, "You can kind of guess where everything is going to be." The writer then adds, "The pharmacy, pet foods, cosmetics and health and beauty sections are now adjacent to the groceries. In the past, groceries and these other sections were often at opposite ends of the store, which made it more difficult for someone looking to pick up some quick consumables to get in and out of Wal-Mart." This is a positive thing because the new layout is easier and more convenient for the customers. Another example of logos comes from the writer saying, "Wal-Mart was a consistent winner during the worst days of the financial crisis. While most retailers are shutting down stores, Wal-Mart has opened 52 Supercenters since February 1." This means that during the recession Wal-Mart was still able to grow and provide jobs to thousands of people in the United States, which is a positive thing. By using logos the writer effectively proves his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing.

The writer uses language to effectively prove the part of his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing. One example of language is, "Wal-Mart loves to shock and awe." This phrase brings an element of war up the remodeling plans of Wal-Mart. The phrase illustrates how cutthroat the new Project Impact plan for Wal-Mart will be. This phrase helps prove the writer's thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing. Another example of language the writer uses to effectively get his message across is, "The world's largest retailer now apparently wants to take out the remaining survivors." This phrase is negative because it is about Wal-Mart's blunt attempt to put other companies out of business. The writer continues to use descriptive language throughout his article. Another example is, "Home in on categories where the competition can be killed." By using this phrase, the writer shows how Wal-Mart's "Project Impact" is negative. The language in these quotes is used to effectively support the writer's thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to take out the competition are a negative thing.

Next, the writer uses language to effectively prove the part of his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing. One example of language comes from Wal-Mart's Northeast general manager Lance De La Rosa, "They are like roads," De La Rosa says proudly. "And look around, the customers are using them. We've already gotten feedback about the wider, more breathable aisles. Our shoppers love them." This quote has good descriptive language because it allows the reader to visualize the new and improved Wal-Mart store. By using language from De La Rosa, the writer is able to effectively prove his thesis that Wal-Mart's plans to remodel are a positive thing.

Today I explained the effective writing tools used by Sean Gregory in the article "Wal-Mart's Latest Move to Crush the Competition." I also explained how he used those tools to support his two-part thesis. The first part of his thesis is Wal-Mart is remodeling their stores, which is a positive thing. He is for the remodeling of the stores, also known as "Project Impact." The second part of his thesis is Wal-Mart is planning on taking out the competition, which is a negative thing. He is against the idea that Wal-Mart is trying to take out the competition. He is effective in supporting his two-part thesis that Wal-Mart is remodeling which is good, and that Wal-Mart is targeting the completion which is bad, by using ethos, pathos, logos, and language.

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