Operation of Toyota

These factors include:

  1. changes in economic conditions and market demand affecting, and the competitive environment in, the automotive markets in Japan, North America, Europe, Asia and other markets in which Toyota operates;
  2. fluctuations in currency exchange rates, particularly with respect to the value of the Japanese yen, the U.S. dollar, the euro, the Australian dollar, the Canadian dollar and the British pound;
  3. Toyota's ability to realize production efficiencies and to implement capital expenditures at the levels and times planned by management;
  4. changes in the laws, regulations and government policies in the markets in which Toyota operates that affect Toyota's automotive operations, particularly laws, regulations and government policies relating to trade, environmental protection, vehicle emissions, vehicle fuel economy and vehicle safety, as well as changes in laws, regulations and government policies that affect Toyota's other operations, including the outcome of future litigation and other legal proceedings;
  5. political instability in the markets in which Toyota operates; (vi) Toyota's ability to timely develop and achieve market acceptance of new products; and
  6. fuel shortages or interruptions in transportation systems, labor strikes, work stoppages or other interruptions to, or difficulties in, the employment of labor in the major markets where Toyota purchases materials, components and supplies for the production of its products or where its products are produced, distributed or sold.

Financial Market and Economic Risks

Toyota's operations are subject to currency and interest rate fluctuations.

Toyota is sensitive to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates and is principally exposed to fluctuations in the value of the Japanese yen, the U.S. dollar and the euro and, to a lesser extent, the Australian dollar, the Canadian dollar and the British pound. Toyota's consolidated financial statements, which are presented in Japanese yen, are affected by foreign currency exchange fluctuations through both translation risk and transaction risk. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates may affect Toyota's pricing of products sold and materials purchased in foreign currencies. In particular, strengthening of the Japanese yen against the U.S. dollar can have an adverse effect on Toyota's operating results. The fluctuation of the Japanese yen against other currencies including the U.S. dollar has been particularly great in the past year. If the Japanese yen further rapidly appreciates against other currencies, including the U.S. dollar, Toyota's financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

Toyota believes that its use of certain derivative financial instruments including interest rate swaps and increased localized production of its products have reduced, but not eliminated, the effects of interest rate and foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. Nonetheless, a negative impact resulting from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates and changes in interest rates may adversely affect Toyota's financial condition and results of operations. For a further discussion of currency and interest rate fluctuations and the use of derivative financial instruments, see "Operating and Financial Review and Prospects", "Operating Results", "Overview Currency Fluctuations", "Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk", and notes 20 and 21 to Toyota's consolidated financial statements.

Derivative financial instruments

Toyota employs derivative financial instruments, including forward foreign currency exchange contracts, foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, interest rate currency swap agreements and interest rate options to manage its exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates. Toyota does not use derivatives for speculation or trading purposes. Changes in the fair value of derivatives are recorded each period in current earnings or through other comprehensive income, depending on whether a derivative is designated as part of a hedge transaction and the type of hedge transaction. The ineffective portion of all hedges is recognized currently in operations.

Derivative financial instruments:

Toyota adopted FAS No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities - an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133, from the fiscal year ended March 31, 2009.

Toyota employs derivative financial instruments, including foreign exchange forward contracts, foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, interest rate currency swap agreements and interest rate options to manage its exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates. Toyota does not use derivatives for speculation or trading.

Fair value hedges -

Toyota enters into interest rate swaps and interest rate currency swap agreements mainly to convert its fixed-rate debt to variable-rate debt. Toyota uses interest rate swap agreements in managing interest rate risk exposure. Interest rate swap agreements are executed as either an integral part of specific debt transactions or on a portfolio basis. Toyota uses interest rate currency swap agreements to hedge exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations on principal and interest payments for borrowings denominated in foreign currencies. Notes and loans payable issued in foreign currencies are hedged by concurrently executing interest rate currency swap agreements, which involve the exchange of foreign currency principal and interest obligations for each functional currency obligations at agreed-upon currency exchange and interest rates.

For the three months ended June 30, 2009, the ineffective portion of Toyota's fair value hedge relationships was not material. For fair value hedging relationships, the components of each derivative's gain or loss are included in the assessment of hedge effectiveness.

Undesignated derivative financial instruments - Toyota uses foreign exchange forward contracts, foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, interest rate currency swap agreements, and interest rate options, to manage its exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations and interest rate fluctuations from an economic perspective, and for which Toyota is unable or has elected not to apply hedge accounting.

Market Risk Disclosures

Toyota is exposed to market risk from changes in foreign currency exchange rates, interest rates, certain commodity and equity security prices. In order to manage the risk arising from changes in foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates, Toyota enters into a variety of derivative financial instruments.

A description of Toyota's accounting policies for derivative instruments is included in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements and further disclosure is provided in notes 20 and 21 to the consolidated financial statements.

Toyota monitors and manages these financial exposures as an integral part of its overall risk management program, which recognizes the unpredictability of financial markets and seeks to reduce the potentially adverse effects on Toyota's operating results.

The financial instruments included in the market risk analysis consist of all of Toyota's cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, finance receivables, securities investments, long-term and short-term debt and all derivative financial instruments. Toyota's portfolio of derivative financial instruments consists of forward foreign currency exchange contracts, foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, interest rate currency swap agreements and interest rate options. Anticipated transactions denominated in foreign currencies that are covered by Toyota's derivative hedging are not included in the market risk analysis. Although operating leases are not required to be included, Toyota has included these instruments in determining interest rate risk.

Derivatives and Other Contracts at Fair Value

Toyota uses derivatives in the normal course of business to manage its exposure to foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates. The accounting is complex and continues to evolve. In addition, there are significant judgments and estimates involved in the estimating of fair value in the absence of quoted market values. These estimates are based upon valuation methodologies deemed appropriate under the circumstances. However, the use of different assumptions may have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.

Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk

Toyota has foreign currency exposures related to buying, selling and financing in currencies other than the local currencies in which it operates. Toyota is exposed to foreign currency risk related to future earnings or assets and liabilities that are exposed due to operating cash flows and various financial instruments that are denominated in foreign currencies. Toyota's most significant foreign currency exposures relate to the U.S. dollar and the euro.

Toyota uses a value-at-risk analysis ("VAR") to evaluate its exposure to changes in foreign currency exchange rates. The VAR of the combined foreign exchange position represents a potential loss in pre-tax earnings that was estimated to be 44.3 billion as of March 31, 2008 and 114.1 billion as of March 31, 2009. Based on Toyota's overall currency exposure (including derivative positions), the risk during the year ended March 31, 2009 to pre-tax cash flow from currency movements was on average 126.0 billion, with a high of 158.9 billion and a low of 97.1 billion.

The VAR was estimated by using a Monte Carlo Simulation Method and assumed 95% confidence level on the realization date and a 10-day holding period.

Interest Rate Risk

Toyota is subject to market risk from exposures to changes in interest rates based on its financing, investing and cash management activities. Toyota enters into various financial instrument transactions to maintain the desired level of exposure to the risk of interest rate fluctuations and to minimize interest expense. The potential decrease in fair value resulting from a hypothetical 100 basis point upward shift in interest rates would be approximately 110.6 billion as of March 31, 2008 and 55.8 billion as of March 31, 2009.

There are certain shortcomings inherent to the sensitivity analyses presented. The model assumes that interest rate changes are instantaneous parallel shifts in the yield curve. However, in reality, changes are rarely instantaneous. Although certain assets and liabilities may have similar maturities or periods to repricing, they may not react correspondingly to changes in market interest rates. Also, the interest rates on certain types of assets and liabilities may fluctuate with changes in market interest rates, while interest rates on other types of assets may lag behind changes in market rates. Finance receivables are less susceptible to prepayments when interest rates change and, as a result, Toyota's model does not address prepayment risk for automotive related finance receivables. However, in the event of a change in interest rates, actual loan prepayments may deviate significantly from the assumptions used in the model.

Commodity Price Risk

Commodity price risk is the possibility of higher or lower

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